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Successful Lit Fest takes off through USC-DCLL

The Agam contributors critiqued the work of the Top 4 winners of the Tutok Poetry Competition. They also shared excerpts of their pieces on climate change, which were featured in Agam. “Literary writing is 99% draft.” Evasco said.

USC’s Department of Communications, Languages, and Literature (DCLL) held its first ever literary festival, providing an avenue for young literature enthusiasts in the university.

With the theme, “Tutok: Cebu through the Language of Lenses”, DCLL conducted a Green Literary Festival along with the culmination of the Photo Poetry Competition on February 16, 2017 at the University of San Carlos (USC) Talamban Campus.

“I commend DCLL, I hope they’ll do this every sem,” Delia Belleza, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, said in her Welcome Remarks. “We don’t just exist…we always desire. It’s nice to see DCLL stepping up.”

Dr. Delia Belleza, the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, giving her welcoming remarks.
Dr. Delia Belleza, the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, giving her welcoming remarks.

The whole day event, which was held at the Philip van Engelen AVR, hosted Agam writers along with the staff of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (ICSC), as well as guests, participants, instructors, and students from USC.

According to Isabella Mendoza of ICSC, Agam is a collection of pictures, prose, and poetry with the theme of climate change, written in different Filipino languages.

 

Agam (derived from the Filipino word agam-agam, meaning “foreboding” or “premonition”) was published by ICSC in 2014 and has won a number of national awards.

The morning session opened the floor to three renowned Agam contributors, Marjorie Evasco, Grace Monte de Ramos, and Padmapani Perez.

The Agam contributors critiqued the work of the Top 4 winners of the Tutok Poetry Competition. They also shared excerpts of their pieces on climate change, which were featured in Agam.

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Pictured from left to right: Grace Monte de Ramos, Padmapani Perez, and Marjorie Evasco.

“Literary writing is 99% draft.” Evasco said, stating that revisions should be done as soon as the poet finishes writing. She also highlighted the importance of using sound devices in poetry: “If you take care of the sound, the sense will present itself.”

Monte de Ramos also shared the importance of titles in poems. According to her, “Making a title is like placing the clasp in a necklace, it brings things together.”

The awarding of winners of the Photography and Poetry Writing Contest was also held.

The first and second place winner of the Poetry Contest came from the same author, sophomore Romar Messiah Bulong, who said that he was overwhelmed but thankful.

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Romar Bulong, whose poems ranked 1st and 2nd place, explaining the thought process behind his works.

The launching of Bidlisiw, a student literary folio, and the 1st Bidlisiw Writers’ Workshop was also done during the afternoon session of the environment-themed event.

During the launching of the Bidlisiw folio, contributors read excerpts of their works in genres of creative non-fiction, fiction, and poetry.

An open mic was provided near the end of the event, where students, guests, and instructors read their own works and poems in English and Bisaya.

“I think it’s always exciting to meet young poets, to listen to their work…it’s always inspiring.” Perez said in an interview, stating that she believed USC students had potential.

“Successful…” remarked Adonis Enricuso, a DCLL faculty and the main organizer of the Lit Fest, when asked about his thoughts on the event, “The [Agam] writers and ICSC definitely signified their interest in coming back. What we did here was also closely related to their project, which is about climate change. We would definitely do this again.”

 

 

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